• DEFAULT

    What does the evaporator do

    what does the evaporator do

    The Fan in the Freezer Compartment of the Fridge Is Not Working

    The refrigerant does not turn to vapor simply by passing through the metering device. It turns to vapor when it absorbed heat from the air moving over the evaporator. Less refrigerant just means it takes less warm air to boil the refrigerant. Which means the air moving over the evaporator doesn't get as cold. Ц Tester Sep 4 '14 at Sep 20, †Ј The evaporator and refrigerant lines should be cold to the touch when running properly, but they should not be frozen. If freezing does occur, it may indicate a problem with the orifice tube, or even too much refrigerant in the system. Many vehicles come with a Уsight glassФ which can be used to see if there are air bubbles present in the.

    It only takes a minute to sign up. Sql developer password expired how to change and share knowledge within a single location that is structured and easy to search. What does the evaporator do the pressure of a refrigerant goes up, so too does the temperature and boiling point. When the pressure drops, the temperature and boiling point drop as well.

    Air conditioning and some heating systems take advantage of this, to cool heat the air inside a building. In a normal system, The compressor compresses the refrigerant vapor. This causes the vapor to be both high temperature, and high pressure. The hot vapor moves through the condenser coils, where some of the heat is transferred into the outside air. When the vapor finally comes out of the condenser, it's a hot liquid. The hot liquid moves through the liquid line, into the building towards the evaporator coils.

    Just before the hot liquid refrigerant reaches the evaporator, it's forced through a metering device. The actual device used depends on the system, but capillary tubes are common. When the hot liquid is forced through the metering device, the pressure drops substantially.

    The pressure drop causes the temperature and boiling point of the liquid to also drop. As indoor air is forced over the evaporator coils, the cold liquid refrigerant in the coils absorbs heat from the air. The heat causes the refrigerant to boil, which changes it to a low pressure vapor. When the refrigerant reaches the end of the evaporator, it's a cool vapor. The cool vapor travels down the suction line, and back to the compressor what vitamins are not water soluble the refrigeration cycle can start again.

    When the refrigerant in the system is low, the pressure; and therefore temperature, of the refrigerant will also be lower. As the indoor air moves over the cool coils, the moisture in the air will condense on the coils. This condensation will drip harmlessly off the coils, and into the condensate drain. Because the coils are so cold, the condensation that forms on the coils will freeze. As ice builds up on the coils, it restricts the air flow through the coils.

    Because of the restriction, the refrigerant can't absorb as much heat from the the indoor air moving over the coils. This causes the refrigerant to boil later in the evaporator, which causes ice to form further along the coils. This situation continues to progress, until the whole evaporator is a block of ice.

    Once that happens, the refrigerant will start to boil in the suction line. This cause the temperature of the suction line to drop, and just like in the evaporator, cause the condensation to freeze. Eventually the freezing works its way all the way back to the compressor, which is where the trouble can really start.

    If allowed to operate in this condition for too long, liquid refrigerant can make its way back to the compressor. If this happens, the compressor can be damaged. It should also be noted. Once the refrigerant level drops too low, the system stops working. So this problem only occurs in a "sweet spot", where the refrigerant is low, but not too low. First some background. The HVAC consists of a closed refrigerant loop. At the outside of your home will be a compressor and coils. The compressor compresses the refrigerant and the process of compressing it forces the refrigerant to give off excess heat which is exhausted out the coils.

    Inside of your home is an evaporator unit with coils. The refrigerant passes through a narrow opening at which point it expands on the other side as a gas think of a spray what does the evaporator do. The process of converting to a gas absorbs heat from the coils which have the return air passing over them on how to change name of company way into the ducts.

    When the refrigerant levels run low, there are different ways of understanding this impact. I've seen it described that there's less refrigerant there to absorb heat from the home and the closed loop gets too cold after exhausting the little heat it does gather outside.

    But to me it makes more sense to imagine the effect of the pressure what to do for a slow running computer in the evaporator coils. The more the pressure drops in those coils, the more extreme the temperature difference as the refrigerant expands to a less and less dense gas.

    But keep in mind that you still have less refrigerant moving the heat, so while the refrigerant that remains is colder, it's also less efficient. Additionally, that lower temperature refrigerant comes with a downside. Once the coils drop below the freezing point, moisture in the return air that's passing over the coils doesn't just condense and run out the condensate drain think of a cold drinking glass on a hot humid day, your coils look like that normally.

    Instead, that condensation freezes until it's a solid block of ice and no air can pass through. This same problem can happen if you run your HVAC when the outside temperature is too low, so much heat gets removed by the outdoor coils, that when the refrigerant runs through the evaporator is gets below the freezing point. This is why it's very important to not oversize an HVAC for your home, it will cool the air too quickly and result in freezing, and it will run for very short periods of time but not remove enough moisture due to those short run times, leaving you very humid in the summer.

    Sign up to join this community. The best answers are voted up and rise to the top. Stack Overflow for Teams Ч Collaborate and share knowledge with a private group. Create a free Team What is Teams? Learn more. Why do the evaporator and suction lines freeze when there is low refrigerant?

    Ask Question. Asked 6 years, 7 months ago. Active 5 years, 10 months ago. Viewed k times. Improve this question. Add a comment. Active Oldest Votes. Normal system In a normal system, The compressor compresses the refrigerant vapor. Low refrigerant When the refrigerant in the system is low, the pressure; and therefore temperature, of the refrigerant will also be lower.

    Improve this answer. Tester Tester k 70 70 gold badges silver badges bronze badges. The refrigerant does not turn to vapor simply by passing through the metering device. It turns to vapor when what does it mean to have vivid dreams absorbed heat from the air moving over the evaporator. Less refrigerant just means it takes less warm air to boil the refrigerant.

    Which means the air moving over the evaporator doesn't get as cold. When the refrigerant passes through the metering device, it goes from a high pressure zone to a lower pressure zone. This lowers the boiling point of the refrigerant. The Overflow Blog. How often do people actually copy and paste from Stack Overflow? Now we know. Featured on Meta. Stack Overflow for Teams is now free for up to 50 users, forever. New onboarding for review queues. Linked 0. Related 3. Hot Network Questions.

    Question feed. Accept all cookies Customize settings.

    What to Do if You Have a Frozen Evaporator Coil | A/C Tips

    If you do choose to clean your evaporator coils yourself, make sure you are using the proper equipment!. 2. Refrigerant Issues. Since refrigerant, most commonly Freon, runs in a closed system, you shouldnТt have to replace your refrigerant unless there is a leak somewhere in the system. A traditional central air conditioning system has two parts: an indoor unit, such as an air handler or furnace and evaporator coil, and an outdoor unit, such as a heat pump or cooling only air conditioner. The Evaporator coil is the indoor unit that sits on top or under the furnace to circulate cool air through your home in the summer, if winter heating is needed an optional electric heater. Apr 14, †Ј It controls the amount of refrigerant moving towards the evaporator. Note that in the case of window ACs, the three components mentioned above are all located in a small metal box installed in a window opening. These are the main components of an air conditioner. LetТs look at how they work together to make an air conditioner do what it does.

    It must seem quite strange to see a frozen evaporator coil when it is over 90 degrees out. Indeed, it may seem like a good thing Ч a frozen coil means icy-cold conditioned air, right? Unfortunately, frozen evaporator coils are a big indication that something is wrong with your air conditioner and ignoring the problem could cause your compressor to burn out.

    The good thing is that you may be able to fix the problem yourself before any expensive repairs become necessary. If you suspect problems with your air conditioner, you may want to see if your evaporator coils are freezing up:. If you HVAC system exhibits any of the above signs and symptoms, it is extremely important that you address the issue as soon as possible. A frozen air conditioner is never a good thing! If you notice that you have frozen evaporator coils, the first thing you should do is turn off your system at its source Ч the breaker box.

    While you are inspecting the possible causes and fixing them, your coils should be able to defrost completely. If your evaporator coil has frozen up, the first thing you should do is turn off your unit. Make sure to turn it off at the breaker box.

    If you continue to run the unit while the coil is frozen, it could cause extensive damage to the system. Some signs that could indicate you have a bad evaporator coil in your cooling unit near Oklahoma City include:. For expert repair services on evaporator coils, call on our highly trained technicians at Interstate today! To thaw a frozen air conditioner can take several hours or even the entire day! Make sure to schedule a repair or inspection service for after the unit has thawed, as there is little a technician can do when a unit is frozen.

    Contact us today to get on our schedule! You can find your evaporator coil in your indoor air handler system. See this energy. If dust and dirt build up around the evaporator coils, which transfer refrigerant to the heat pump, it will put extra strain on your system to condition the air, putting your evaporator coil at risk of freezing. The coils need to be cleaned periodically for proper heat absorption to occur; otherwise, the coils may just freeze over.

    This is another reason why it is important to schedule annual professional maintenance Ч your system will be cleaned and inspected in order to avoid potential problems like this one. Better yet, join a home maintenance plan so you never forget this important home maintenance task. Schedule professional HVAC maintenance once a year to avoid these sorts of problems.

    Watch this video and learn how:. If you do choose to clean your evaporator coils yourself, make sure you are using the proper equipment! Although leaks coming from regular wear and tear are common, they sometimes go unnoticed for long periods of time.

    Running your HVAC system with low refrigerant levels creates unnecessary strain on your system and can cause ice to build up on your evaporator coils. There really is not DIY way of doing this, so your best bet is to call in a professional to inspect your system for leaks and restore your refrigerant levels. You may have a frozen evaporator coil because there is improper airflow from your blower.

    This can happen for a number of different reasons, but most often involves a dirty air filter. For optimum efficiency, we recommend replacing your air filter every 30 days during peak use. A good test to see if you need to replace your air filter is to observe if light can shine through the filter or not. Set phone and calendar reminders as an extra precautionary measure to remember this important home maintenance task.

    The other thing you should check for is proper airflow through your supply and return vents and registers. Although you may have heard it is a good idea to close off vents in unused rooms to save money, this is never a good idea! In fact, you should go around your home and make sure that all vents and registers are unblocked. Your heat pump and air handler will not function very well when outside temperatures are below 60 degrees. Diagnose your thermostat for any obvious problems.

    Try to avoid using your air conditioner at night when the temperatures drop. We recommend setting your programmable thermostat to 78 degrees or higher while at home and 84 degrees or higher while away from home. Especially in humid climates, your evaporator coil will have to work extra hard to get rid of all that humidity in the air. When the humidity is removed, condensation forms and is drained away from your home.

    This is fine, except when you have a clogged drainpipe, which can cause the water top back up and freeze on your evaporator coils. The frozen condensation further exacerbates the problem. In order to fix this problem, you will need to unclog your drainpipe. While you were inspecting and fixing any airflow, refrigerant, thermostat, and drainage problems, your frozen evaporator coils should have defrosted by now.

    Once it is completely thawed, turn your system back on and see if any of your DIY troubleshooting solved the problem. Most likely, you have a refrigerant leak that needs to be checked out by a professional. Contact Reviews Team Financing. Previous Next. Signs That You Have a Frozen Evaporator Coil If you suspect problems with your air conditioner, you may want to see if your evaporator coils are freezing up: Check for ice around the outdoor refrigerant line.

    Look around your air handler for condensation and moisture. Is your condensate drain pan full or overflowing? If yes, do you have a clogged drainpipe? What do I do if my evaporator coil is frozen near OKC? How do I know if my evaporator coil is bad near OKC? Some signs that could indicate you have a bad evaporator coil in your cooling unit near Oklahoma City include: Warm air coming out of the vents.

    Unusual hissing or banging noises coming from the unit. The indoor unit has leaks around it. How long does it take to thaw a frozen air conditioner near OKC? Dirty Evaporator Coils If dust and dirt build up around the evaporator coils, which transfer refrigerant to the heat pump, it will put extra strain on your system to condition the air, putting your evaporator coil at risk of freezing.

    Related Posts. Talk With Our Experts Call

    3 comments

    Add a comment

    Your email will not be published. Required fields are marked *