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    What does incontinence mean in medical terms

    what does incontinence mean in medical terms

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    fecal incontinence (incontinence of the feces) inability to control defecation; both physiologic and psychological conditions can be contributing factors. Called also encopresis and bowel incontinence. See also bowel elimination, altered. Mar 29, †Ј Medical Definition of Incontinence Medical Editor: Charles Patrick Davis, MD, PhD Incontinence: The inability to control excretions, to hold urine in .

    These example sentences are selected automatically from various online news sources to reflect current usage of the word 'incontinence. Send us feedback. See more words from the same century. Accessed 23 Apr. More Definitions for incontinence. Thesaurus: All synonyms and antonyms for incontinence. Nglish: Translation of incontinence for Spanish Speakers. Britannica English: Translation of incontinence for Arabic Speakers.

    What made you want to look up incontinence? Please tell us where you read or heard it including the quote, if possible. Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced searchЧad what does incontinence mean in medical terms You've waited days, weeks, months, even years for What's the difference? Two words of uncertainty. One vowel can mean a big difference. We're intent on clearing it up.

    We're gonna stop you right there. How to use a word that literally drives some pe The awkward case of 'his or her'. Can you correctly identify these flowers? Which of these things doesn't belong? Test your knowledge - and maybe learn something a Login or Register. Save Word. Definition of incontinence.

    It has restrained the vices of theft and incontinence. Examples of incontinence in a Sentence Recent Examples on the Web Our take: These comfortable disposables for female dogs work well for younger untrained pets, and also provide overnight protection for older females with incontinence.

    First Known Use of incontinence 14th century, in the meaning defined above. Keep scrolling for more. Learn More about incontinence. Time Traveler for incontinence The first known use of incontinence was in the 14th century See more words from the same century.

    Dictionary Entries near incontinence incontestable clause incontested in context incontinence incontinency incontinent incontinently See More Nearby Entries. Style: MLA. Medical Definition of incontinence. Comments on incontinence What made you want to look up incontinence? Show Comments Hide Comments. Get Word of the Day daily email! Test Your Vocabulary. Test your what is the purpose of a dually truck - and maybe learn something along the way.

    Spell words. Make bears. Love words? Need even more definitions? Words at Play 7 Phrases from the Calendar You've waited days, weeks, months, even years for We're intent on clearing it up 'Nip it in the butt' or how to rank acidity in organic chemistry it in the bud'?

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    Urinary incontinence is unintentional loss of urine that is sufficient enough in frequency and amount to cause physical and/or emotional distress in the person experiencing it. Bladder and Bowel Incontinence. Bladder or bowel incontinence means there is a problem holding in urine or stool. You may have unwanted passage of urine or stool that you canТt control. These conditions can be stressful to deal with. But donТt feel embarrassed about talking with your healthcare provider. Incontinence definition is - the quality or state of being incontinent: such as. How to use incontinence in a sentence.

    Incontinence describes any accidental or involuntary loss of:. Incontinence can range in severity from a small leak to complete loss of bladder or bowel control. The Continence Foundation of Australia offers a wide variety of information in English and other languages covering:. Urinary incontinence poor bladder control is a common condition affecting 1 in 3 women, 1 in 10 men and 1 in 5 children in Australia.

    Faecal incontinence poor bowel control is more common than people think Ч affecting approximately 1 in 20 Australians. Incontinence affects women , men and children of all ages, physical ability and background. There are however some health conditions and life events that can put you at an increased risk of developing either urinary or faecal incontinence. Risk factors commonly linked with urinary incontinence include:. A risk factor for faecal incontinence is urinary incontinence.

    Other risk factors are similar to those of urinary incontinence, but also include:. If you fall into one of these risk categories and have concerns about bladder or bowel control speak to your family doctor, a continence health professional or contact the National Continence Helpline on 33 00 Plenty can be done to improve or in some cases cure incontinence.

    Changes such as adopting a healthier diet and lifestyle, incorporating regular exercise, and practicing good toilet habits can all lead to improvements. Visit our prevention page for more information.

    The Deloitte Access Economics report The economic impact of incontinence in Australia explores the current prevalence and economic impact of incontinence in Australia, and provides an outline of the future projected growth of this burden. Download an electronic version of the full report KB. If you experience bladder or bowel problems, but are not sure if you should seek help, try this quick quiz.

    If you answer 'yes' to any of these questions you may have a bladder or bowel control problem. If you think you have a continence issue the first step is to talk to your family doctor or contact the National Continence Helpline on 33 00 The National Continence Helpline is staffed by Nurse Continence Specialists who offer free and confidential information, advice and support. They can also provide you with a wide range of resources and referrals to local services.

    Learn about how the bowel works, the signs of a healthy bowel, and problems that can occur. Caring for someone with incontinence can be a challenge, but there's advice and support available. Search Search. Understanding incontinence. About Continence Understanding incontinence. Continence is the ability to control your bladder and bowel.

    Incontinence is the involuntary loss of bladder and bowel control. Incontinence describes any accidental or involuntary loss of: urine wee from the bladder Ч known as urinary incontinence faeces poo or flatus wind from the bowel Ч known as faecal incontinence.

    The Continence Foundation of Australia offers a wide variety of information in English and other languages covering: bladder , bowel and pelvic floor health tips for preventing and managing incontinence advice for carers support services and financial schemes that are available.

    Urinary incontinence Urinary incontinence poor bladder control is a common condition affecting 1 in 3 women, 1 in 10 men and 1 in 5 children in Australia. Learn more. Faecal incontinence Faecal incontinence poor bowel control is more common than people think Ч affecting approximately 1 in 20 Australians.

    Urinary incontinence risk factors. Faecal incontinence risk factors. Other risk factors are similar to those of urinary incontinence, but also include: chronic diarrhoea dementia. Report key findings. Over 5 million Australians Ч 1 in 4 people aged 15 years or over Ч experience bladder or bowel control problems.

    This number is predicted to grow to 6. Strong pelvic floor muscles are necessary for bladder and bowel control and good sexual function. Pelvic floor muscle exercises have been shown to prevent and treat incontinence at any age. Less than 2 out of 10 women 7. Bladder and bowel control problems are not a natural part of ageing or having a baby.

    Incontinence can have long-term physical and emotional impact; affecting self-esteem, motivation and independence. Do you sometimes feel you have not completely emptied your bladder? Do you rush to use the toilet? Are you frequently nervous because you think you might lose control of your bladder or bowel? Do you wake up twice or more during the night to go to the toilet? Do you sometimes leak before you get to the toilet?

    Do you sometimes leak when you lift something heavy, sneeze, cough or laugh? Do you sometimes leak when you exercise or play sport?

    Do you sometimes leak when you change from a seated or lying position to a standing position? Do you strain to empty your bowel? Do you sometimes soil your underwear? Do you plan your daily routine around where the nearest toilet is? About continence. Types of incontinence Knowing what type of incontinence you have is an important step to finding the right treatment. About the bladder Learn about how the bladder works, the signs of a healthy bladder, and problems that can occur.

    About the bowel Learn about how the bowel works, the signs of a healthy bowel, and problems that can occur. Caring for someone Caring for someone with incontinence can be a challenge, but there's advice and support available.

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