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    How to repair cracked steering wheel

    how to repair cracked steering wheel

    How To Repair a Cracked Steering Wheel

    Aug 25, Tool Dude Tony shows you step-by-step how to restore a cracked steering using POR15 epoxy putty, sand paper and Rust-Oleum paint. This is another episode in. Sep 08, Repairing a cracked hard plastic or rubber steering wheel is a lot easier than you might think. To get started, youll first need to remove the steering wheel, and clean it with dishwashing detergent and water. After youve washed it, spray with PRE Painting Prep to remove oily residue that may have come from your skin.

    JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website. You've spent repajr hours on bodywork and paint, your car's engine is spotless, and the interior looks perfect If you're in that situation, you have several options: live with the cracked steering wheel, try to locate a good used steering wheel, purchase a reproduction or aftermarket steering wheel, how to enlarge text on windows 8 repair your existing steering wheel.

    For many, locating a good used steering wheel is difficult, and reproduction steering wheels if available are pricey. This leaves you with the options of either living with a cracked steering wheel, or repairing the existing steering wheel. Repairing a cracked hard plastic or hwo steering wheel is a lot easier than you might think.

    To make the job even easier, Eastwood offers several steering wheel restoration kits that include stedring instructions. To get started, you'll first need to remove the steering wheel, and clean it with dishwashing detergent and water.

    After you've washed it, spray with PRE Painting Prep repaig remove oily residue that may have come from your skin. For any cracks, you will want to use a triangle file to "V" the crack.

    Tip: a Dremel-style tool also works well. This will allow you to completely fill the crack with carcked PC-7 Epoxy. Mix the PC-7 following the directions on the back of the can. Slightly overfill the crack with the PC Tip: wet your finger with water to smooth out the PC Allow the PC-7 to dry for 24 hours. After the PC-7 has thoroughly dried, start how to prevent pop up ads in firefox it ctacked grit sandpaper, and finish with grit sandpaper.

    Spray it again with PRE to eepair the surface. Be sure to not handle the steering wheel with your bare hands, as this may contaminate the surface with oils from your skin. You are now ready to apply a primer.

    Use Gray Self-Etch Primer to apply several light coats to smooth the surface. Once it dries, you're ready to apply your topcoat. The self-etching primer creates a great base for almost any topcoat finish epoxies are not recommended. Our vinyl interior dyes work well as topcoats over the Self-Etching primer. Need Support or Have a Question? Press To Call Steering Wheel Restoration You've spent rspair hours on bodywork and paint, your car's engine is spotless, and the interior looks perfect Here is a "before" picture of a steering wheel that we recently restored.

    This image shows the cracks the steering wheel had. This steering wheel had been repainted by a previous owner, so we sanded the finish off to get to the bare rubber. Note that the old paint was hiding the how to make fake latex wounds of the crack. Once we removed the paint, we could see the full eteering of the damage, We "V"-ed the crack to accept the PC-7 putty.

    This image shows one of the cracks filled in with the PC-7, and then sanded with grit and grit sandpaper. Next, crackd steering steerinb was wiped down with PRE and primed. Here is the finished product. After the steering wheel was primed, it was painted with ivory white base coat, and then top-coated with a Urethane Clear Coat.

    Why Restore Your Old Leather Steering Wheel?

    Jun 10, To get started, youll first need to remove the steering wheel, and clean it with dishwashing detergent and water. After youve washed it, spray with PRE Painting Prep to remove oily residue that may have come from your skin. For any cracks, you will want to use a triangle file to V the crack. Tip: a Dremel-style tool also works well. Repairing a cracked hard plastic or rubber steering wheel is a lot easier than you might think. To make the job even easier, Eastwood offers several steering wheel restoration kits that include detailed instructions. To get started, you'll first need to remove the steering wheel, and clean it with dishwashing detergent and water. Remove the steering wheel, clean it with dishwashing detergent and water, and dry. Then gently clean with denatured alcohol to remove any oils or buildup on the plastic. 2. Depending on the size of the cracks, you are going to need to open them up a bit (preferably down to the metal).

    A simulated wood-grain steering wheel made of plastic was standard equipment on Corvettes, and plastic-rimmed steering wheels were the order of the day from the late s through the mid s for most American-made cars. Over time, these steering wheels are prone to cracking, especially in areas of the country where the temperature changes significantly from summer to winter. And since we like to keep our car restoration project's cost to a minimum, this is what we decided to do.

    It's not a hard job, but it does take time since there are several steps involved. Here's how to go about it. The first task is to remove the steering wheel from the car, and this starts with removing the horn button. In the case of the Corvette, it is removed by pulling on it from the edges until it snaps free. On other cars it may be secured with screws or clips that will have to be removed to free it. The three Philips screws that secure the horn activator ring are removed next. Make sure the alignment of the wheel is straight before removing it from the steering column.

    Six screws are used to secure the wheel to the Corvette steering column, but you may require a wheel puller for removal on other cars. Since this is a generic Steering Wheel Restoration Kit, there are a lot of extra things included in the kit that I didn't need for this particular refurbishment, but that you may require for your own project.

    The other crack is at the bottom 6 o'clock position and it starts almost at the edge of the bottom spoke and travels around the rim at a slight angle. This crack will be a bit more involved to fix. A pad of fine steel wool was used to dress the spokes as a first step.

    The steel wool removes any surface dirt and grime on the stainless steel spokes and hub. The hack saw included in the POR kit is used to saw through the cracks all around the rim to enlarge them right down to the steel core of the wheel. Here you can see the V-grove in the upper crack. The purpose of this enlarged groove is to provide a good bonding surface for the epoxy putty. Because of the proximity of the spoke, it wasn't possible to file the lower crack out.

    A rasp bit in a Dremel was used to enlarge the crack at the spoke area. Here's the lower crack after enlarging it with the Dremel. Notice how all the plastic is removed right down to the steel core of the wheel to provide a good bonding surface. Equal amounts of the two-part epoxy putty are cut by laying the bars next to each other. Be sure to cover the remaining portion of the bars with plastic to prevent them from drying out.

    The two parts of the epoxy putty must be thoroughly kneaded together; if they aren't thoroughly mixed, the epoxy putty won't harden completely. Keep a dish of water nearby when using the putty. Moistening your hands before kneading will prevent the putty from sticking to your skin. You may have to dip your hands frequently while kneading the putty. Wrap the "worm" entirely around the crack and force it into the crack all the way down to the metal core.

    Roll out additional putty and continue to apply it into the cracks until a uniform mound slightly higher than the surface of the steering wheel is formed around the circumference of the cracks.

    Wet your fingers and work the putty to feather and smooth the edges, wiping the surface with water frequently. This putty sets very slowly so you have plenty of time. Don't rush this step, since the smoother you make the surface now the less time and work will have to be spent sanding later.

    Here's the upper crack, still with lots of extra putty on it, but you can see how the feathering and smoothing is progressing. Here's the lower crack at the spoke, and the feathering and smoothing is finished on this one. The pointed handle end of the file is used to remove excess putty at the base of the wheel where it meets the spoke.

    Here's the underside of the wheel to show you how the bottom of the spoke crack looks after feathering and smoothing. After letting the wheel set over the weekend so the epoxy putty cured and hardened entirely, a piece of grit sandpaper wrapped around the contoured sanding block included in the kit was used to remove the bulk of the excess putty, leaving a very slight mound around the center of the crack.

    The wheel was then washed with clean water and allowed to dry thoroughly. After spending quite a bit of time trying to match the color of the wheel to automotive paint charts with no success, I decided the only way to get an exact match was to mix my own paint.

    I used the cap from a mm film container as a mixing tray. Some plastic-stemmed cotton swabs and a disposable art brush are also required. Depending on the color of your steering wheel, you may not have to go through this tedious trial-and-error mixing process to achieve the right shade.

    In addition to automotive paint touch-up stick colors, be sure to check nail polish colors to see if you can find an acceptable out-of-the-bottle match for your wheel's color. Use a scissor to cut-off the cotton end from one side of the swabs, leaving the exposed plastic stem available for use as a "dropper".

    After much experimentation, I finally hit upon the right formula to match the color of the plastic steering wheel. Dip the stem of a swab into the Engine Red enamel and deposit 4 drops into the mm mixing cap. Next, use another swab stem to deposit 8 drops of the Green enamel into the cap, right over the red. Red and green, when mixed together, produce brown, but don't mix them yet. Shake the Gold enamel vigorously to thoroughly mix the paint, then use another swab stem to deliver two drops of the gold into the mixing cap.

    This will give the final mixed color the slight metallic tinge present in the plastic of the wheel as it came from the factory.

    You can use a coffee stirrer or another swab stem to thoroughly blend the green, red and gold paints together. It is absolutely imperative that you mix these colors thoroughly. When mixed, apply a drop to the steering wheel to check the color match, but make sure you do this color-check in daylight.

    If necessary, you can add a drop or two of red to lighten the shade of brown, or a drop or two of green to darken it. Be sure to wipe your sample drops from the wheel with a clean cloth before they dry. Adjust the color as necessary until you're satisfied with the match.

    It should not be necessary to add any more gold to the mix, since you only want a hint of metallic in the final color. Use the disposable art brush to apply the paint to the repaired areas with smooth, flowing strokes, and overlap the repaired areas slightly, feathering the edges with the brush.

    The enamel dries fairly quickly, so work carefully but swiftly. You can't even see the repair. I gave it two full hours to dry before proceeding with the next step. I used an Xacto hobby knife to scrape off some minute remnants of putty and dried enamel from the spoke where it joins the rim of the wheel after the paint had dried. The repaired and painted areas were very lightly wet sanded with grit paper to reduce their gloss a little so that the enamel matched the luster of the unpainted plastic.

    When I say wet sand it lightly, I mean it - if you sand too hard you'll remove the newly-applied enamel and you'll have to mix and reapply another batch. Carefully mask off the spokes, starting at the rim of the wheel and working your way down to the hub. Mask the hub as well, and use your fingernail to make sure the tape is sealed tight to the spokes at the rim line.

    Eastwood's Diamond Clear for Painted Surfaces was used to produce a uniform gloss over the entire surface of the wheel. Eastwood's reusable aerosol trigger handle made controlling the spray easier and more precise.

    I did my spraying outside on an overcast day, mounting the wheel on a fence post of our dog's kennel. Diffused natural daylight, like that on an overcast day, is best for color-matching and for spraying the clear gloss on since you don't have to contend with reflections altering your color perception. I gave the wheel three light coats of Eastwood Diamond Clear.

    Multiple light coats are less likely to have runs and they yield a more uniform overall finish. Here's the finished wheel ready for remounting on my '67 Vette. If you're not satisfied with the way your wheel came out, use some paint remover or solvent to strip the wheel and start over again.

    In truth, it took a couple of tries before I got results I was satisfied with, but it was well worth the effort. Box Morristown, NJ www. All Rights Reserved.

    Reproducing any material on this website without permission is prohibited. The 3-sided file is used next to file a V-groove into the sawed crack.

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