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    How to reblue a shotgun

    how to reblue a shotgun

    Mar 08,  · I demonstrate how I blue a gun funslovestory.com about the gun and my thoughts. funslovestory.com?v=XG7tbMjuHAY. May 23,  · Buy the cold bluing kit here: funslovestory.com Professional Cold Blue: funslovestory.com is the entire process from start to finish.

    Different forms of bluing have been used by gunsmiths and gun how to make orange peel face pack at home for centuries now to protect guns from wear and damage, but you might still be wondering what gun bluing is. Bluing or black oxidizing is a process of treating steel to create a thin protective shell around it. It works by turning rust, into black iron oxide. The blue-black image of black iron oxide is what gives the name to this process.

    It can be performed on gun barrels and other firearm components. There are several methods to blue gun barrels, such as hot bluing, cold bluing, rust bluing, niter bluing, charcoal bluing, and heat bluing. Gun refinishing is one of the most gratifying phases of the gunsmithing work. Few gunsmithing operations are as rewarding as seeing a rusted and badly abused gun transformed into a beautiful, ornate, blue-black finished arm.

    It turns a worn weapon into one that looks brand new. Before, the arrival of the modern solutions for bluing guns, giving a gun that unique, blue-black look was a long process that demands many hours of intensive, hands-on work. Hot gun bluing is the most common bluing technique offered by most firearm manufacturers. The main benefit of the hot bluing method is gun protection from corrosion.

    This method extends the life of a gun and restores it. Use steel wool to remove any scarring, loose rust, or pitting from the arm metal. Take the gun all the way apart. The adequate chemicals for the bluing method are caustic chemicals. Always wear rubber gloves while working with these chemicals. Allow the gun parts to stay in the bluing solution from 15 to 30 minutes. Double-check when the metal has reached the desired color tone of bluing and remove it from the solution at that time.

    Rotate the parts through the cold water to wash off the bluing salts. Leave to air dry for 3 minutes. After cold water rinsing, put the gun parts in boiling water. Simple parts need to be soaked for 15 to 20 minutes, while complex or decorated parts should be soaked for about 45 minutes. Soak the treated gun parts in a bath.

    Let the parts in the oil bath for an hour, until they have cooled, and you finished gun bluing task successfully. Read the following steps and learn how to cold blue a gun. Polish the metal with the sandpaper as you would with either of the other bluing processes, but how you want to clean the arm depends on whether you need to blue the entire gun or touch up existing bluing.

    Gently spread the solution to the part to be blued as evenly as possible, applying a clean applicator. Use the solution in a single pass to cover small surfaces, or in parts no larger than 4 to 5 inches when covering large areas, then smooth it out using sandpaper.

    Repeat the applying of the solution several more times until you got the wanted bluing result. Spread a layer of gun oil a few more time, applying a cotton ball to remove the previous layer before spreading a new layer.

    Rust bluing is a great blue-black finish that was used by firearms companies before when hot bluing was invented. Rust bluing is very popular nowadays for custom hobbyists and gunsmiths on account of the quality and durability of finish that can be achieved without too much equipment.

    Rust bluing is a method of making steel rust in a controlled environment. Niter bluing can produce all shades between straw and dark blue. The process involves soaking of the gun part into a hot liquid potassium nitrate, which produces a uniformly colored finish. Like all other bluing methods, the most crucial step is metal preparation. The metal surfaces are block sanded to remove all imperfections and then polished to a mirror shine just before the bluing process, which avoids oxidation of the steel.

    It is one of the traditional bluing methods used on many fine firearms. Smith Wesson hired the American Gas Furnace Company to develop a bluing oil that included special whale oil. The final result is a shiny blue-black finish that is very durable. A charcoal blued high polished part will produce a mirror-like finish that is second to none.

    The bluing process is often accelerated and intensified with the utility of heat. All items become more elastic and smooth to change when they are heated. Heat bluing or flame bluing method is practically the heat treating that imparts color based on the temperature, and the ingredients present during the heating. By heating gun parts, you can achieve colors from straw to black and deep blue. Coat the gun parts with a mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acid in the metal container.

    The acid solution forces the metal to rust, but to do so evenly. Scrub off the red oxide rust that has formed, leaving the black oxide finish underneath. Remove the rusted section with a ball of steel wool. Rerun the acid procedure, what happened to greg from wiggles, and scrubbing until you get the desired level of bluing.

    Apply the oil on gun treated gun parts. The oil prevents the formation of rust and protects the metal finish from sweat, body oil, wear, and dirt.

    Gun Bluing — How to Blue a Gun. Hot Bluing. Follow the next 6 steps in order to perform hot gunmetal blue process like true gunsmith. Step 1 Disassembling and Polishing Use steel wool to remove any scarring, loose rust, or pitting from the arm metal. Step 2 Soaking and Rinsing Parts should be dipped in the bath for 15 minutes and scrubbed while being immersed to remove any dirt, oil, or grease that could get in the way of the bluing process.

    You can use any how to make a skin rash go away chemical cleaners such as sodium triphosphate, naphtha, denatured alcohol, and acetone. Rinse the cleaning solution in a few minutes. How to clean dog vomit from carpet naturally 4 Cold Water Rinsing Rotate the parts through the cold water to wash off the bluing salts.

    Step 5 Boiling After cold water rinsing, put the gun parts in boiling water. Step 6 Final Process Soak the treated gun parts in a bath. Cold Bluing. Step 1 Cleaning and Polishing Polish the metal with the sandpaper as you would with either of the other bluing processes, but how you want to clean the arm depends on whether you need to blue the entire gun or touch up existing bluing.

    Step 2 Use the Bluing Solution Gently spread the solution to the part to be blued as evenly as possible, applying a clean applicator.

    Rust Bluing. Charcoal Bluing It is one of the traditional bluing methods used on many fine firearms. Heat Bluing The bluing process is often accelerated and intensified with the utility of heat. How to re-blue a Gun? Step 1 Polishing Use steel wool to remove any pitting, loose rust, or scarring from the gun. Step 2 Cleaning Clean away any oil, grease, or dirt that remains chemically.

    You can use sodium, naphtha, triphosphate, denatured alcohol, and acetone. Then rinse the cleaning solution.

    Step 4 Boiling Soak the gun parts in boiling water. It stops the rusting by removing the acid solution. Step 5 Scrubbing Scrub off the red oxide rust that has formed, leaving the black oxide finish underneath. Step 6 Apply Oil Apply the oil on gun treated gun parts.

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    Cold Bluing

    Sep 19,  · Preparation, like painting or staining, is the longest part. Some steel wool or emery cloth (or both) some degreaser, a buffing wheel or lots of time with hand polish and then a basin to blue the metal in. Cold blue works well but ends up not looking as 'deep' and a hot blue. Both can be done at home by a semi competent do it your selfer.

    Last Updated: October 26, References. To create this article, volunteer authors worked to edit and improve it over time. There are 21 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been viewed , times.

    Learn more Bluing is a thin protective shell of black iron oxide Fe 3 O 4 intended to provide nominal protection against rusting for gun metal.

    Bluing is a thin protective shell of black iron oxide that protects gunmetal from rusting. However, if it just needs a touch-up, you can reblue your gun at home. This will help the finish set properly. Keep applying layers until you have the darkness you want. Smooth out the finish with a fresh piece of steel wool before painting on each new layer. To learn how to reblue a gun that has totally worn away, read on!

    Did this summary help you? Yes No. Log in Social login does not work in incognito and private browsers. Please log in with your username or email to continue. No account yet? Create an account. Edit this Article. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. By using our site, you agree to our cookie policy. Cookie Settings. Learn why people trust wikiHow. Download Article Explore this Article parts.

    Tips and Warnings. Things You'll Need. Related Articles. Article Summary. Part 1 of Consider how much of the old bluing has worn away.

    If most of the original bluing is still in place, you may be able to touch up the bluing yourself with a cold bluing kit. If most of the original bluing has worn away, you may want to consider removing the rest of the old bluing and hot bluing the gun metal. Consider the age of the gun. Vintage guns dating back to the 19th century were blued using either the rust bluing or fume bluing process.

    These processes are not used commercially today because of the amount of time involved. There are products commercially available that will let you perform the rust bluing process yourself [1] X Research source , or you can find someone who will perform this process for you.

    Vintage guns that feature silver soldering or brazing cannot be hot-blued, because the caustic salts used in this process will eat the silver. Double-barreled shotguns commonly used this kind of soldering or brazing to keep the barrels aligned properly. Consider the value of the gun. Hot bluing costs significantly more than cold bluing does, so you need to consider the cost of the re-bluing process you plan to use against what you spent to acquire the gun in the first place and its resale value if you were to sell it.

    You should also consider the intrinsic value of the gun, or what it means to you, as well as its actual monetary value. If the gun is a family heirloom, you may want to consider spending more money on re-bluing the gun, even if its monetary value is the same that of a gun purchased at a sporting goods store.

    Consider the potential cost of the bluing process. In addition to the monetary and intrinsic value of the gun that needs re-bluing, you should also take into account the costs of the bluing process you are considering using.

    Cold bluing, described in Part Two of this article, is the simplest of the processes, and therefore the cheapest, but it is also the least durable. If you plan to handle the gun a lot after cold bluing it, you can expect the cold bluing to wear off fairly quickly.

    Hot bluing, described in Part Three of this article, is more durable than cold bluing and lasts longer than either cold bluing or rust bluing, but it requires more work and more equipment to perform. If you feel the gun deserves to be hot blued, but you find the work involved too daunting to do yourself, you may want to hire it done.

    Rust bluing, described in Part Four of this article, is somewhat less materials-intensive than hot bluing, but more materials-intensive than cold bluing. It is also the most time-intensive of the bluing processes, as you have to let the gun metal rest for a time to achieve the level of coloring you want.

    Again, you may want to hire someone to rust-blue your gun if you find the process too daunting to do yourself. Part 2 of Remove the old bluing, if desired. Depending on how worn the original bluing is, you may wish to remove it entirely before re-bluing the gun. You can use one of the following chemicals to do so: A phosphoric acid-based automotive rust remover, such as Naval Jelly. White vinegar, which contains acetic acid. Polish the gun metal.

    Polishing removes surface rust and any scratches or pitting that the gun may have suffered over the years. You can use either steel wool or to grit sandpaper for this purpose. Clean the gun metal. How you choose to clean the metal depends on whether you plan to blue the entire gun or touch up existing bluing. If you plan to blue the entire gun, you may want to immerse the metal in a cleaning solution. Cleaning solutions you can use for this purpose include sodium triphosphate a commercial detergent , denatured alcohol, or naphtha.

    If you plan to just touch up existing bluing, you can apply a cleaning oil to the places where you want to remove the old bluing, then apply acetone on cotton balls to remove the cleaning oil.

    One such cleaning oil, a mixture of vegetable and mineral oils, alcohol, benzyl acetate, and alkaline salts, is sold commercially under the name Ballistol. Heat the metal gently. Although this process is called cold bluing, gently heating the gun metal before applying the bluing can help it absorb the bluing better and create a better finish.

    Heat the metal by leaving it out in the sun for several hours, with a heat gun or blow dryer, or in a conventional oven set to its lowest setting. Apply the bluing solution. Slowly apply the solution to the area to be blued as evenly as possible, using a clean applicator.

    Apply the solution in a single pass to cover small areas, or in sections no larger than 2 to 3 inches 5 to 7. This will prevent the bluing from appearing mottled.

    For smaller areas, use a cotton ball, cotton swab, or flat toothpick no larger than the area to be covered. You can soak small parts like screws or hard to cover areas in the bluing solution. After the part is completely covered, you can pour the solution that landed on the pan or tray instead of the gun metal back into the bottle and reuse it.

    Apply the solution several more times until you have the level of bluing you want. Apply each layer with a fresh applicator, and use a fresh piece of steel wool to smooth out each new layer. The more layers you apply the darker the bluing will be; however, each new layer is progressively less effective than the layer before it. Seven layers should be enough, in most cases, to achieve a dark blue-black finish.

    Try to sand no more than the stubborn spots themselves. Season the finish with gun oil once you have the level of bluing you want. Apply a layer of gun oil every few hours, using a cotton ball to remove the previous layer before applying a new layer.

    Do not use the cleaning oil for this process, as it will take off the bluing you worked so hard to put on. Part 3 of Polish the gun parts to be blued. Again, you can use either steel wool or to grit sandpaper to polish the metal. Ready the parts to be dipped in the cleaning and bluing solutions. While the cleaning solution you use may not require it, the chemicals used in the hot bluing process proper, normally potassium nitrate and sodium hydroxide, are highly caustic.

    Rigging the parts now before the cleaning step will make it easier to transfer from the cleaning to the bluing tank, and will also clean the support wire and basket to prevent either from contaminating the gun parts in the bluing tank. Dip the gun parts in a cleaning solution bath. Parts should be immersed in the bath for 10 to 15 minutes and scrubbed while being immersed to remove any oil, dirt, or grease that could get in the way of the bluing process.

    Rinse off the cleaning solution in cold water. Rinsing should take no more than 2 to 3 minutes. Dip the gun parts in the bluing solution. Before heating the bluing solution, stir it thoroughly to break up any salt clumps that may occur on the surface or at the bottom of the tank holding the solution. When dipping gun barrels in bluing solution, dip them at an angle to allow any air bubbles that may form to escape. Be sure to immerse the barrel completely. Swirl the metal basket containing smaller gun parts around in the solution to ensure the parts are completely coated with the bluing solution.

    Leave the gun parts in the bluing solution from 15 to 30 minutes.

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