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    How to do good group discussion

    how to do good group discussion

    Effective facilitation of a discussion involves the recognition and employment of different perspectives and different skills to create an inclusive environment. In order to do so, it is important to consider the features of effective discussions, and conditions that . Here are Some Tips for a Successful Group Discussion The first and the foremost tip for an individual to perform well in a GD is to learn the art of participation. Don’t Try to take the initiative. Don’t wait for the others to start the discussion. Always volunteer yourself and start the A.

    In the current scenario, group discussion has become an important selection criteria for the students aspiring to get into a good B School and all leading organizations have started depending grouup this process for the recruitment of new employees.

    A group discussion is simply a method instrumental in judging the team spirit, discsusion qualities, out of the box thinking, and other managerial qualities in an individual. The answer is No. Every individual works in a team and has to rely on his fellow workers for his easy working and better output.

    He has to be a good team player to make his mark in the ever challenging corporate world. Through group discussions, the interviewer can how to calculate risk score in project management how well an individual can glod in a team. He can very easily find out how well an individual can perform in teams, how good a leader he is and also his creative skills and intelligence quotient.

    Every individual must learn the successful tips of group how to travel to boracay from malaysia to fair well in the interviews as well as the screening process of educational institutes. The first and the foremost tip for an individual to perform well in a GD is to learn the art of participation. Take the initiative, participate in ciscussion discussion and share your ideas with others.

    Never shout in a group discussion and always wait for your turn to speak. Be polite but firm. Try to take the initiative. Always volunteer yourself and start the discussions in an extremely confident manner. Introduce yourself and your team members and then start with discuswion topic but one thing to remember here is that one must initiate the Group Discussion only when he or she is well versed with the topic. A leader is the one who actually gives the group discussion a direction and guides other team members when they seem to be lost or confused.

    Like a true leader, an individual must try his level best to refrain from personal favours. As the leader of the group, he must ensure that the discussion does not end up in fighting and reaches a conclusion. One must co only if he is well prepared with the topic. Never depend on guess works how to do good group discussion group discussions as it sometimes can seriously go against you.

    Avoid using slangs or crack jokes in between the discussions as it is considered highly unprofessional. Never be rigid in group discussions. Always keep in mind that the other person is also as learned as you. Always listen to what he is saying and then only respond. Be a good and a patient listener.

    Debate logically and sensibly and try to take everyone along with you. Read a lot and always keep your eyes and ears open. Always begin your day with the newspaper and know what is happening around you. An individual must be aware of the current events to succeed well in a group discussion. Be alert always. A participant usually gets around 15 minutes to think about the topic. You need to think fast and cover as much as you can.

    Always take care of your words. The content has to be sensible, crisp and well supported with examples or real life situations. Take care of your dressing as well. Female candidates should also avoid cakey makeup or flaunt heavy jewellery.

    The clattering sounds of bangles what are some threats to the tropical rainforest act as a disturbing element in formal discussions. Be in professional attire and avoid loud ggoup. An individual must keep in his mind that group discussion is meant for bringing out the managerial skills of an individual. The organizer of the group discussion will never appreciate you or give you the credit if you shout or fight in group discussions.

    Be calm, composed, confident and neutral to create an impression in the discussion and win over others. View All Articles. To Know more, click on About Us. The use of this material is free for learning and education purpose.

    Please reference authorship of content used, including link s how to cut back pampas grass youtube ManagementStudyGuide.

    Table of Contents

    Conducting a focus group discussion with a natural group may reveal discrepancies and similarities between what people say and how they act, and how other participants react and comment in . Introduce the purpose of the discussion and ensure that the participants have the same understanding. Explain the organization and structure (including the time line) of the discussion, when it will end, and whether or not there are formal follow-up plans. ("We'll speak in small groups for an hour then spend a half-hour in general discussion. In order to win in a group discussion you need to develop these qualities in yourself. You may do it on your own or take a professional help. Here are some tips to develop these skills: Effective communication: Lean to speak clearly, support your point with examples, facts, references, statistics.

    Your contribution can help change lives. Donate now. Engage colleagues, share ideas, and reinvent the way you work. Learn more. A local coalition forms a task force to address the rising HIV rate among teens in the community.

    A group of parents meets to wrestle with their feeling that their school district is shortchanging its students. A college class in human services approaches the topic of dealing with reluctant participants. Members of an environmental group attend a workshop on the effects of global warming. A community health educator facilitates a smoking cessation support group. All of these might be examples of group discussions, although they have different purposes, take place in different locations, and probably run in different ways.

    The literal definition of a group discussion is obvious: a critical conversation about a particular topic, or perhaps a range of topics, conducted in a group of a size that allows participation by all members. When the group numbers eight or more, a leader or facilitator, whether formal or informal, is almost always helpful in ensuring an effective discussion. A group discussion is a type of meeting, but it differs from the formal meetings in a number of ways:.

    Many group discussions have no specific purpose except the exchange of ideas and opinions. Ultimately, an effective group discussion is one in which many different ideas and viewpoints are heard and considered. This allows the group to accomplish its purpose if it has one, or to establish a basis either for ongoing discussion or for further contact and collaboration among its members.

    Possible leadership styles of a group discussion also vary. A group leader or facilitator might be directive or non-directive; that is, she might try to control what goes on to a large extent; or she might assume that the group should be in control, and that her job is to facilitate the process.

    In most group discussions, leaders who are relatively non-directive make for a more broad-ranging outlay of ideas, and a more satisfying experience for participants. Directive leaders can be necessary in some situations. If a goal must be reached in a short time period, a directive leader might help to keep the group focused. If the situation is particularly difficult, a directive leader might be needed to keep control of the discussion and make. As explained in the opening paragraphs of this section, group discussions are common in a democratic society.

    There are a number of reasons for this, some practical and some philosophical. You might choose to lead a group discussion, or you might find yourself drafted for the task. Some of the most common reasons that you might be in that situation:. You might find yourself in one of these situations if you fall into one of the categories of people who are often tapped to lead group discussions.

    In the latter case, you may have the chance to choose a space and otherwise structure the situation. If you have time to prepare beforehand, there are a number of things you may be able to do to make the participants more comfortable, and thus to make discussion easier.

    Usually, that means comfortable furniture that can be moved around so that, for instance, the group can form a circle, allowing everyone to see and hear everyone else easily. It may also mean a space away from the ordinary. The sound of water from the mill stream rushing by put everyone at ease, and encouraged creative thought. The ultimate comfort, and one that breaks down barriers among people, is that of eating and drinking.

    If you have the opportunity, learn as much as possible about the topic under discussion. This is not meant to make you the expert, but rather to allow you to ask good questions that will help the group generate ideas.

    Make sure everyone gets any necessary information, readings, or other material beforehand. If participants are asked to read something, consider questions, complete a task, or otherwise prepare for the discussion, make sure that the assignment is attended to and used. The first thing you need to think about is leadership style, which we mentioned briefly earlier in the section. Are you a directive or non-directive leader?

    The chances are that, like most of us, you fall somewhere in between the extremes of the leader who sets the agenda and dominates the group completely, and the leader who essentially leads not at all. Facilitators are non-directive, and try to keep themselves out of the discussion, except to ask questions or make statements that advance it.

    For most group discussions, the facilitator role is probably a good ideal to strive for. The ground rules of a group discussion are the guidelines that help to keep the discussion on track, and prevent it from deteriorating into namecalling or simply argument.

    Some you might suggest, if the group has trouble coming up with the first one or two:. Ground rules may also be a place to discuss recording the session.

    Who will take notes, record important points, questions for further discussion, areas of agreement or disagreement? You might present an agenda for approval, and change it as the group requires, or you and the group can create one together.

    There may actually be no need for one, in that the goal may simply be to discuss an issue or idea. How active you are might depend on your leadership style, but you definitely have some responsibilities here. They include setting, or helping the group to set the discussion topic; fostering the open process; involving all participants; asking questions or offering ideas to advance the discussion; summarizing or clarifying important points, arguments, and ideas; and wrapping up the session. The exceptions are opinions or ideas that are discriminatory or downright false.

    This is especially true when the group is stuck, either because two opposing ideas or factions are at an impasse, or because no one is able or willing to say anything. The notes might also include a summary of conclusions that were reached, as well as any assignments or follow-up activities that were agreed on. If the session was one-time, or was the last of a series, your job may now be done. Leading an effective group discussion takes preparation if you have the opportunity for it , an understanding of and commitment to an open process, and a willingness to let go of your ego and biases.

    If you can do these things, the chances are you can become a discussion leader that can help groups achieve the results they want. A constant question that leaders — and members — of any group have is what to do about racist, sexist, or homophobic remarks, especially in a homogeneous group where most or all of the members except the leader may agree with them.

    There is no clear-cut answer, although if they pass unchallenged, it may appear you condone the attitude expressed. How you challenge prejudice is the real question. All too often, conflict — whether conflicting opinions, conflicting world views, or conflicting personalities — is so frightening to people that they do their best to ignore it or gloss it over.

    That reaction not only leaves the conflict unresolved — and therefore growing, so that it will be much stronger when it surfaces later— but fails to examine the issues that it raises. If those are brought out in the open and discussed reasonably, the two sides often find that they have as much agreement as disagreement, and can resolve their differences by putting their ideas together. Sometimes individuals or factions that are trying to dominate can disrupt the process of the group.

    Both Sections 1 and 2 of this chapter contain some guidelines for dealing with this type of situation. The exception here is when someone has been chosen by her community or group to represent its point of view in a multi-sector discussion. She may have agreed to sponsor particular ideas that are important to her group, but she may still have her own opinions as well, especially in other areas.

    You have some choices about how you do that, however. If the question is less clear-cut, you might want to throw it back to the group, and use it as a spur to discussion. Group discussions are common in our society, and have a variety of purposes, from planning an intervention or initiative to mutual support to problem-solving to addressing an issue of local concern. It helps greatly if the leader comes to the task with a democratic or, especially, a collaborative style, and with an understanding of how a group functions.

    A good group discussion leader has to pay attention to the process and content of the discussion as well as to the people who make up the group. She has to prepare the space and the setting to the extent possible; help the group establish ground rules that will keep it moving civilly and comfortably; provide whatever materials are necessary; familiarize herself with the topic; and make sure that any pre-discussion readings or assignments get to participants in plenty of time.

    Then she has to guide the discussion, being careful to promote an open process; involve everyone and let no one dominate; attend to the personal issues and needs of individual group members when they affect the group; summarize or clarify when appropriate; ask questions to keep the discussion moving, and put aside her own agenda, ego, and biases. An effective group discussion can lay the groundwork for action and real community change.

    Study Circles Resource Center. Information and publications related to study circles, participatory discussion groups meant to address community issues. Facilitating Political Discussions from the Institute for Democracy and Higher Education at Tufts University is designed to assist experienced facilitators in training others to facilitate politically charged conversations. The materials are broken down into "modules" and facilitation trainers can use some or all of them to suit their needs.

    Project on Civic Reflection provides information about leading study circles on civic reflection. Tips on university teaching, but much of the information is useful in other circumstances as well. Johnson, D. Joining Together: Group theory and group skills. Skip to main content. Toggle navigation Navigation. Group Facilitation and Problem-Solving » Section 4. Chapter Chapter 16 Sections Section 1. Conducting Effective Meetings Section 2. Developing Facilitation Skills Section 3.

    Techniques for Leading Group Discussions. The Tool Box needs your help to remain available. Toggle navigation Chapter Sections. Section 1. Learn how to effectively conduct a critical conversation about a particular topic, or topics, that allows participation by all members of your organization.

    What is an effective group discussion? Why would you lead a group discussion? When might you lead a group discussion? How do you lead a group discussion? Do's and don'ts for discussion leaders A local coalition forms a task force to address the rising HIV rate among teens in the community.

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